HISTORY OF THE SEATTLE OPEN HOUSING CAMPAIGN, 1959-1968

THE SEATTLE OPEN HOUSING CAMPAIGN, 1959-1968:Housing Segregation and Open Housing Legislation Anne FrantillaSeattle Municipal Archives Seattle’s African-American population increased dramatically between 1940 and 1960, making the community the city’s largest minority group.  As blacks moved north and west during and after World War II in search of employment, their numbers overtook those of Asian groups–the Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino–which together historically formed Seattle’s largest minority … Continue reading HISTORY OF THE SEATTLE OPEN HOUSING CAMPAIGN, 1959-1968

FREEDOM RIDES (1961)

Following the momentum of student-led sit-ins in Greensboro, North Carolina and Nashville, Tennesssee in early 1960, an interracial group of activists, led by Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) Executive Director James Farmer, decided to continue to challenge Jim Crow segregation in the South by organizing “freedom rides” through the region.  They used as their model CORE’s 1946 “Journey of Reconciliation” where an interracial group rode interstate buses to test the enforcement of the … Continue reading FREEDOM RIDES (1961)

WYSINGER V. CROOKSHANK, 1888

Wysinger v. Crookshank is the first case that rendered school segregation of African Americans in California contrary to the law. On October 1, 1888, 58-year-old Edmond Wysinger, a former slave who bought his freedom working in the California mines, moved to Visalia, California. When he attempted to enroll his son, Arthur, in the only high school in Visalia, he was told that because Arthur was “colored” … Continue reading WYSINGER V. CROOKSHANK, 1888