Revisit: THE DRED SCOTT DECISION, 1857

The Dred Scott v. Sandford case (1857) was the most important slavery-related decision in the United States Supreme Court’s history.  Coming on the eve of the Civil War, and seven years after the Missouri Compromise of 1850, the decision affected the national political scene, impacted the rights of free blacks, and reinforced the institution of slavery. Continue reading Revisit: THE DRED SCOTT DECISION, 1857

Today’s Lesson: THE HISTORY OF BLACK HISTORY MONTH

The story of Black History Month begins in Chicago during the late summer of 1915. An alumnus of the University of Chicago with many friends in the city, Carter G. Woodson traveled from Washington, D.C. to participate in a national celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of emancipation sponsored by the state of Illinois.  Continue reading Today’s Lesson: THE HISTORY OF BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Revisit: SPRINGFIELD RACE RIOT, 1908

In mid-August 1908, the white population of Springfield, Illinois hastily reacted to reports that a white woman has been assaulted in her home by a black man.  Soon afterwards another instance of an assault by a black man on a white woman was reported.  These incidents, coming within hours of each other, inflamed a gathering mob Continue reading Revisit: SPRINGFIELD RACE RIOT, 1908

Visit: CHICAGO RACE RIOT, 1919

On July 27, 1919 when large crowds of white and black patrons went to the Lake Michigan beach in Chicago, Illinois to seek relief from the 96 degree heat, an angry dispute erupted over the stoning of Eugene Williams, a young African American swimmer who inadvertently crossed a segregated boundary into the “white” swimming area.  Continue reading Visit: CHICAGO RACE RIOT, 1919