Revisit: CHICAGO FREEDOM MOVEMENT (1965–1967)

The Chicago Freedom Movement, led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., James Bevel, and Al Raby, was created to challenge systemic racial segregation and discrimination in Chicago and its suburbs. The movement, which included rallies, protest marches, boycotts, and other forms of nonviolent direct action, addressed various issues facing black Chicago residents, including segregated housing, educational deficiencies, income, employment, and health disparities based on racism and black community development. The Chicago Freedom Movement, the most ambitious civil rights campaign in the northern United States, lasted from mid-1965 to early 1967 and is credited with inspiring the Fair Housing Act passed by the U.S. Congress in 1968 Continue reading Revisit: CHICAGO FREEDOM MOVEMENT (1965–1967)

Revisit: THE BIRMINGHAM CAMPAIGN (1963)

The Birmingham Campaign was a movement led in early 1963 by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), which sought to bring national attention to the efforts of local Black leaders to desegregate public facilities in Birmingham, Alabama. The campaign was led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Reverends James Bevel and Fred Shuttlesworth, among others. Continue reading Revisit: THE BIRMINGHAM CAMPAIGN (1963)

Revisit: THE PEARL INCIDENT, 1848

The Pearl Incident in 1848 was the largest recorded escape attempt by enslaved people in United States history. On April 15, 1848, 77 slaves attempted to flee Washington, D.C., by sailing away on a schooner called The Pearl. They planned to sail south along the Potomac River and then north up the Chesapeake Bay, cross overland to the Delaware River, and then to the free state of New Jersey, a distance of nearly 225 miles. Continue reading Revisit: THE PEARL INCIDENT, 1848